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Silverlakers Love Food (Pt.1)!

Silverlakers Love Food (Pt.1)!

Silverlake Axis has multiple offices in the region to help serve all our clients. Many Silverlakers are native to the country they work in, but some of us also travel or relocate to other offices depending on the projects we’re attached to. Silverlake Axis offices are often made up of multiple nationalities. So, what do we do besides work? Eat, of course! For part one of this series, I’ll be focusing on some of the most popular local food from 3 of our Asian offices: Malaysia (our HQ), Singapore (where we’re publicly listed), and the Philippines.

Malaysia

Malaysia is widely recognized as a food haven, with a diverse and multiracial population. All 14 states seem to have their own specialties along with specific ways of preparation. Our HQ in Petaling Jaya has no shortage of interesting hawker fare, and here are 3 (out of many) popular dishes that are commonly had.

Steamed coconut rice with anchovies, peanuts, chilli sauce, egg


Nasi lemak

Malaysia’s unofficial national dish is made up of several elements. In its simplest form, it consists of rice cooked in coconut milk, fried anchovies in shrimp paste and chili sauce, peanuts, a hard-boiled egg, and cucumbers. Meat like fried chicken or fish is usually added as a topping.

Steamed coconut rice with anchovies, peanuts, chilli sauce, egg


Nasi lemak

Malaysia’s unofficial national dish is made up of several elements. In its simplest form, it consists of rice cooked in coconut milk, fried anchovies in shrimp paste and chili sauce, peanuts, a hard-boiled egg, and cucumbers. Meat like fried chicken or fish is usually added as a topping.

Stir fried rice noodles, eggs, prawns, cockles, chives, bean sprouts




Char koay teow

One of Penang’s most iconic dishes, char koay teow is made up of stir fried rice noodles, eggs, prawns, cockles, chives, and bean sprouts. It’s savory with a hint of spice and is served at several hawker stalls and coffee shops.

Stir fried rice noodles, eggs, prawns, cockles, chives, bean sprouts




Char koay teow

One of Penang’s most iconic dishes, char koay teow is made up of stir fried rice noodles, eggs, prawns, cockles, chives, and bean sprouts. It’s savory with a hint of spice and is served at several hawker stalls and coffee shops.

Rice served on banana leaf with condiments


Banana leaf rice

The Indian community in Malaysia has contributed greatly to local taste, and one of its most popular dishes is banana leaf rice. True to its name, rice and 3 types of vegetables are served onto a banana leaf, before diners choose which curry to pour over their rice. The best part is, all parts of this meal are refillable! Diners also often choose to add meat to the meal.

Rice served on banana leaf with condiments


Banana leaf rice

The Indian community in Malaysia has contributed greatly to local taste, and one of its most popular dishes is banana leaf rice. True to its name, rice and 3 types of vegetables are served onto a banana leaf, before diners choose which curry to pour over their rice. The best part is, all parts of this meal are refillable! Diners also often choose to add meat to the meal.

Singapore

Located right below Malaysia’s southernmost state, Singapore is a metropolitan island that shares many of the same dishes as Malaysia. A friendly food rivalry is constantly ongoing between Singaporeans and Malaysians, but Singaporean dishes do come with their own unique twists.

Rice cooked in chicken broth with steamed chicken


Hainanese chicken rice

This highly celebrated dish is Singapore’s pride and joy, and is easily found in every hawker center and food court throughout the country. The rice has to be cooked in chicken stock, fat, ginger, garlic, and salt, while the chicken itself is often steamed or roasted to a silky finish. It is often eaten with chilli sauce and dark sweet sauce.

Rice cooked in chicken broth with steamed chicken


Hainanese chicken rice

This highly celebrated dish is Singapore’s pride and joy, and is easily found in every hawker center and food court throughout the country. The rice has to be cooked in chicken stock, fat, ginger, garlic, and salt, while the chicken itself is often steamed or roasted to a silky finish. It is often eaten with chilli sauce and dark sweet sauce.

Mud crabs cooked in sweet spicy chilli sauce


Chilli crab

Among other things, this Singaporean dish speaks for the island nation’s love of seafood. Mud crabs are commonly used and are usually steamed before they are stir fried in a semi-thick, sweet and savory tomato and chilli based sauce. Small deep fried buns accompany this dish, and diners often use the bread to mop up the remaining sauce.

Mud crabs cooked in sweet spicy chilli sauce


Chilli crab

Among other things, this Singaporean dish speaks for the island nation’s love of seafood. Mud crabs are commonly used and are usually steamed before they are stir fried in a semi-thick, sweet and savory tomato and chilli based sauce. Small deep fried buns accompany this dish, and diners often use the bread to mop up the remaining sauce.

Stir fried yellow egg noodles and vermicelli in prawn stock



Hokkien prawn mee

The Singaporean version of this dish is a combination of stir fried yellow egg noodles and vermicelli in prawn stock, with cubes of fried pork fat, prawns, fish cake and squid tossed in for flavor. This dish was a product of post-war Singapore, where noodle factory workers would gather at the end of the day to fry up whatever noodles they had left.

Stir fried yellow egg noodles and vermicelli in prawn stock



Hokkien prawn mee

The Singaporean version of this dish is a combination of stir fried yellow egg noodles and vermicelli in prawn stock, with cubes of fried pork fat, prawns, fish cake and squid tossed in for flavor. This dish was a product of post-war Singapore, where noodle factory workers would gather at the end of the day to fry up whatever noodles they had left.

Philippines

The Philippines is a country in the Western Pacific, and is made up of over 7,000 islands! Our Silverlake office is located in Manila, the nation’s capital which is known for its centuries of history, waterfront promenade, and its wonderfully diverse cuisine. Here are 3 dishes that were contributed by one of our Filipina colleagues!

Meat stew with tamarind, garlic, onions, and tomatoes


Sinigang na baboy

This dish is a tamarind-based soup or stew that is sour and savory in taste. It is probably culturally Tagalog in origin, and the meat in sinigang is usually stewed with tamarind, garlic, onions, and tomatoes. Vegetables like okra, radish, water spinach, and more are also included for flavor.

Meat stew with tamarind, garlic, onions, and tomatoes


Sinigang na baboy

This dish is a tamarind-based soup or stew that is sour and savory in taste. It is probably culturally Tagalog in origin, and the meat in sinigang is usually stewed with tamarind, garlic, onions, and tomatoes. Vegetables like okra, radish, water spinach, and more are also included for flavor.

Stewed oxtail and meat in peanut sauce




Kare-kare

This dish is a stew that is made from a base of stewed oxtail, pork hocks, beef meat, and other offal or tripe. It is complimented with a thick savory peanut sauce and is also cooked with a lot of vegetables. The stew is flavored with ground roasted peanuts, onions, and garlic.

Stewed oxtail and meat in peanut sauce




Kare-kare

This dish is a stew that is made from a base of stewed oxtail, pork hocks, beef meat, and other offal or tripe. It is complimented with a thick savory peanut sauce and is also cooked with a lot of vegetables. The stew is flavored with ground roasted peanuts, onions, and garlic.

Whole roasted suckling pig


Lechon

No fiesta in the Philippines is complete without Lechon, and it is often the centerpiece of any celebration. Lechon refers to a whole roasted suckling pig cooked over charcoal and is a popular food in Spain and its former colonies. This is the national dish of the Philippines and is generally kept for special occasions.

Whole roasted suckling pig


Lechon

No fiesta in the Philippines is complete without Lechon, and it is often the centerpiece of any celebration. Lechon refers to a whole roasted suckling pig cooked over charcoal and is a popular food in Spain and its former colonies. This is the national dish of the Philippines and is generally kept for special occasions.

And that covers food from our first 3 Silverlake Axis countries! Stay tuned for part 2!